It’s a small world for a lot of analysts looking at the hiring outlook.

Four times a year, the release of Manpower Inc.’s Employment Outlook Survey defines the mood on hiring trends around the world. Based on interviews with 61,000 employers, the survey has become possibly the most trusted barometer on the worldwide job market over its nearly half a century in existence.

The key word there is “worldwide.” The EOS takes a snapshot of employer attitudes in 36 countries and territories around the globe. And yet, for some reason, most of the analysis of the survey is still remarkably provincial, and with the release this month of the newest numbers, it’s more of the same.

American news outlets tend to zero in on the news for their own metropolitan market, or at best the U.S. outlook as a whole, sometimes completely ignoring the data from other parts of the world. And it’s not just a Yankee ego thing—other countries are just as guilty of ignoring the bigger picture in favor of the hometown stats.

That’s understandable to some degree; we all have a natural inclination to care more about what’s going on in our own backyard. And providing a breakdown to the local level can be especially useful due to the sheer amount of data packed into this report.

That’s understandable to some degree; we all have a natural inclination to care more about what’s going on in our own backyard. And providing a breakdown to the local level can be especially useful due to the sheer amount of data packed into this report.

There are so many competing numbers, in fact, that different analysts can paint entirely different pictures of the hiring outlook. Daniele Sahr of The Huffington Post, for instance, writes of the U.S. employment picture: “Are we nearing a rebound in hiring? If the anecdotal evidence is any indication, we certainly are. According to Manpower’s quarterly Employment Outlook Survey, hiring in almost every sector is about to get better.” That’s because employers in 12 out of 13 industry sectors reported that they will add staff in the second quarter of 2010. (Once again, it was bad news for the government sector, which was the unlucky thirteenth.)

But others, like Mark Fightmaster at bloggingstocks.com, hada far less exuberant take on the U.S. numbers, writing of the current hiring outlook that: “While this percentage is better than the same quarter a year ago, it is virtually flat from the first quarter. In fact, it is down slightly, as a net 6% of firms hired in the first quarter.” That’s because about two-thirds of U.S. employers said they plan to keep staffing levels flat.

Overall, the consensus is that hiring levels are inching up in the U.S. At a seasonally adjusted five percent, there’s a moderate uptick in expectations for hiring in the U.S., as the adjusted outlook at this time last year was –2 percent.

However, that’s only in the U.S. What is far less reported is that if we take a look at the bigger global picture, there is some interesting information about new markets around the world.

The strongest year-over-year outlooks are coming from India, which reports a whopping net employment outlook of 39 percent, with hiring expected across all geographic regions and industrial sectors. Brazil, Taiwan, Singapore, Australia, Peru and Costa Rica are also reporting very strong hiring expectations. The entire Asia Pacific region (with the exception of Japan) looks strong for job growth, and a modest improvement is projected throughout the Americas. Overall, employers in 27 of 36 countries and territories expect some positive hiring activity in the second quarter, with only eight reporting negative hiring expectations. Last year, 18 countries and territories were reporting negative outlooks. Based on Manpower’s latest, it’s clear that the global job picture is improving.

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